CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology: In a first, an all-women team wins the Nobel Prize

That scientists who pioneered the revolutionary CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology, the biggest game-changer in biology in recent years, will win the Nobel Prize was never in doubt; it was only a question of when and who would get recognised for the work done to develop the tool.

IGIB team finds a new target to reverse iron overload disease

IGIB researchers have discovered a pathway that regulates hepcidin hormone production. The hepcidin hormone is a central regulator of iron in the body, and its dysregulation can lead to anaemia or excess iron accumulation in liver and heart, leading to multi-organ failure. The researchers identified a target pathway using a different approach and found a … Continue reading IGIB team finds a new target to reverse iron overload disease

Tissue-matched, unrelated donor transplants to aid thalassemics

Till recently, transplantation of haematopoietic stem cells found in the bone marrow has been the only curative option for patients with thalassemia major (genetic inability to produce normal, adult haemoglobin leading to severe anaemia). Since only 30-35% of such patients have a suitable tissue-matched donor in the family, a majority of them rely on regular … Continue reading Tissue-matched, unrelated donor transplants to aid thalassemics

Genetic therapy cures thalassaemia

Published in The Hindu on September 16, 2010 Nearly 10,000 children born every year in India suffer from thalassaemia major, an inherited disease that is caused by an abnormality in haemoglobin (an oxygen-carrying protein) production. This results in ineffective production of red blood cells, thus causing anaemia. This necessitates regular blood transfusion. It not only … Continue reading Genetic therapy cures thalassaemia